Richard Levy Gallery


In the Gallery

 
   



 

Unstructured Merriment:
25th Anniversary Exhibition & Fundraiser

September 30 - November 23

Gallery 25th Anniversary Reception & Raffle:
Saturday, October 15th, 6:00 -9:00 pm
 

 

 

site by Bulletproof Studios

 
 

In celebration of our 25th anniversary, Richard Levy Gallery is pleased to present Unstructured Merriment, a group show that highlights the gallery’s distinctive history. In the1970s Richard Levy moved to Albuquerque and studied the history of photography with Beaumont Newhall at the University of New Mexico. An avid collector and purveyor, Levy had an antique store in Nob Hill that sold old photographs, vintage postcards, and silkscreen posters, among other things. In 1991 he opened the gallery at 514 Central Avenue SW and co-founded 21 Steps Editions, which produced waterless lithographs by leading contemporary artists. Showing work by local, national, and international artists, Richard Levy has created one of the top contemporary galleries in New Mexico.

With a wide variety of mediums, Unstructured Merriment includes works by John Baldessari, Jeff Kellar, Ed Ruscha, Sol LeWitt and Sachiko Cho, and Albuquerque artists Thomas Barrow, Beau Carey, Jenna Kuiper, Leigh Anne Langwell, Earl McBride, Emi Ozawa, Mary Tsiongas, and Tom Waldron. Selected ephemera that Levy has collected throughout the years will be on display, as well as his handmade hooked rug of the Albuquerque Isotopes baseball stadium.

 

 

As a silver anniversary gift to our friends and community, we are hosting a 25th anniversary celebration and fundraiser to benefit We Are This City (WATC), an organization that supports local artists and Albuquerque community art projects. Funds are being raised by raffle ticket sales. Raffle items include selected 21 Steps editions, works by gallery artists, WATC publications, and more. Preview artworks and preorder raffle tickets on the WATC website. The anniversary party features a pop-up event with an interactive projection installation, music by DJ Dave12, and an opportunity to participate in a WATC-sponsored community art project. Further information about this organization can be found on their website at wearethiscity.com.

This event coincides with our neighbors 516 ARTS 10 year and Central Features Contemporary Art 2nd year anniversary parties. Collectively we are celebrating 37 years of contemprary arts in downtown Albuquerque on October 15th.

Images for this exhibition can be found on our website www.levygallery.com. High-resolution images are available on request.

Dates: September 30 – November 23
Gallery Celebrations: Saturday, October 15, 6 – 9 pm
Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 11 am – 4 pm
514 Central Avenue SW, Albuquerque, NM 87102 505.766.9888
info@levygallery.com, www.levygallery.com



In the World    

 

Purchase Here

Khadija 11, Beruit,
2014
image size: 11 x 14
paper size: 13 x 16
archival ink jet
limited edition of 50
$350

100% of the sales to benefit Syrian Refugees in Lebanon and distributed by the Karam Foundation.
Help us meet our $17,000 goal to aid Syrian Refugees
 
About Invisible Children
Lately we have been hearing on the news about the plights of the Syrian refugees and the huge refugee influx to neighboring countries. However, not many people take the time to look at each of them as a person, an individual with an identity. When I was in Beirut in 2014, I was poignantly struck by the Syrian refugee children and teens standing at every other street corner begging for money, selling red roses or miscellaneous trinkets, or carrying beat-up shoe-shining equipment. They all said they were “working” and were being brought by the truckload every morning and expected to bring money back at the end of each day. People often walked or drove by them seemingly indifferent or just fed-up by what the influx of refugees has done to the country’s economy and resources. As a mother, I was truly moved by the children and troubled by the fact that they had become almost faceless and invisible to the locals. These kids and teens seemed to blend with the graffiti on the walls in front of which they were standing. They are sadly only perceived by people and on the news as “the refugees”. The group identity seemed to define them more than their individual identity. I tried through my images to put an individual face to the invisible children, to give them their dignity and portray their individuality. - Rania Matar

About the Artist
Rania Matar was born and raised in Lebanon. She moved to the U.S. in 1984 to study architecture at Cornell University and later photography at New England School of Photography and Maine Photographic Workshops. Matar currently works full time on her personal photography projects and teaches at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. Her images are in the permanent collections worldwide including the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Portland Art Museum, Portland OR, Worcester deCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln MA among others.